Atlanta Teacher Allegedly Beaten by Ninth Grader for Trying to Stop Fight

A high school teacher was taken to the hospital after he was allegedly beaten by a student in his classroom in Atlanta, Georgia, on Monday.

Reports said the teacher was trying to prevent a ninth grader from fighting with a classmate at Frederick Douglass High School when he began punching the teacher in the head.

Video footage of the incident which was taken by another student shows the teenager standing over the teacher and repeatedly hitting him in the head as he tries to protect himself from the blows. Eventually, another individual steps in and pulls the student away from the teacher.

Reports said the teacher was taken to Grady Hospital and treated for minor injuries. He was released soon after.

The Atlanta Public Schools (APS) said in a statement regarding the alleged assault that “the safety and security of students and staff is a top priority in APS.”

Reports said that following the altercation, an APS police officer arrested the student and tried to place him in the Fulton County Juvenile Detention Center after charging him with assault. However, the detention center refused to take him into custody so the teenager was handed over to his parent.

“Both students involved in the initial altercation will face discipline in line with the APS code of student conduct,” WJCL 22 reported.

On Tuesday, Breitbart News reported that APS had banned two softball teams from participating in the state playoffs after a fight between the two teams broke out last week, causing parents and other attendees to rush the field.

In a written statement, APS spokesman, Ian Smith, wrote that students and parents are required to follow the school’s code of conduct while engaging in activities on school property.

“This decision to have both teams forgo the postseason was a difficult one. However, all students, student athletes and parents representing APS are required to adhere to a code of conduct that calls for respect and appropriate behavior at school or on school property at any time,” he concluded.

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