Historic Snowstorm in Spain Collapses Parts of the Country

People walk amid a heavy snowfall in Madrid on January 9, 2021.

People walk amid a heavy snowfall in Madrid on January 9, 2021.
Photo: Benjamin Cremel/AFP (Getty Images)

Unfortunately, it’s become commonplace for some to take a look at or experience extreme weather and say, hey, climate change is not that bad. That’s exactly what the regional president of Aragón, Javier Lambán, said on Twitter, which sparked outrage.

“By the look of the images of Storm Filomena, it doesn’t seem like climate change is going to necessarily mean that snow will disappear. Last year was very bountiful for our mountains in this sense,” he wrote on Twitter on Saturday.

Experts criticized the president, and said that climate change didn’t mean that we were always going to have warm temperatures, but that we were going to have extreme weather, which is what happened with Filomena. It’s worth mentioning that one big snowstorm does not mean climate change is canceled. In case you needed a sad reminder, 2020 was the hottest year in human history.

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